sat 16/10/2021

Reviews

Macbeth, Almeida Theatre review – vivid, but much too long

Aleks Sierz

Remembering the months of lockdown, I can’t be the only person to thrill to this play’s opening lines, “When shall we three meet again?”, a phrase evocative enough to be borrowed as the first line of this year’s Wolf Alice album, Blue Weekend.

Manic Street Preachers, Brighton Dome review - solid gig occasionally explodes to another level

Thomas H Green

There is a three song segment midway through Manic Street Preachers’ set which suddenly ramps everything up. For this brief while, the performance and response in the sold-out, nigh-on-2000-capacity venue, elevates the concert from another decent gig on another tour in front of a devoted fanbase, to something more memorable and truly electric.

Tamestit, LSO, Ticciati, LSO St Luke's...

David Nice

Returning to LSO St Luke’s, formerly a beacon in the darkness of semi-lockdown for the lucky few allowed to feast upon the London Symphony Orchestra...

White Noise, Bridge Theatre review - provocative...

Matt Wolf

"I can't sleep": So goes the fateful opening line of White Noise, the Suzan-Lori Parks play disturbing enough to spark many a restless night in...

Romeo and Juliet, Birmingham Royal Ballet &...

Jenny Gilbert

Two households, both alike in dignity … and both launching their respective seasons with a production of Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet. For...

Maximo Park, Saint Luke's and the Winged Ox, Glasgow - indie veterans still have fire in their bellies

Jonathan Geddes

A new line-up and album seems to have rejuvenated the artful rockers

Karine Polwart, Birmingham Town Hall Review: Expertly crafted modern folk

Miranda Heggie

the Karine Polwart Trio return to Brum with a mix of old and new music

Mary Wellesley: Hidden Hands review - passion in the parchment

Boyd Tonkin

Medieval manuscripts and their forgotten artist-authors come to life

Don Pasquale, Glyndebourne Tour review - winning comeback for a sturdy veteran

Boyd Tonkin

Sweet spots abound in Donizetti's much-loved sugar-daddy romp

The Velvet Underground review - Todd Haynes tunnels through band history

Saskia Baron

Ingeniously composed documentary portrait, with John Cale the definitive star

Marcin Wicha: Things I Didn’t Throw Out review - the stories told by stacks of stuff

Anna Parker

Connecting a mother's helpless love of things with questions of presence and personhood

Jonathan Franzen: Crossroads review - can goodness ever be its own reward?

Markie Robson-Scott

The first volume of Franzen's new family saga leaves you wanting more

Two-Piano Gala, Kings Place review - five pianists, two pianos, too many pieces

Bernard Hughes

Captivating Mozart and Schubert offset by note-heavy Ravel and Rachmaninov

Jason Manford, London Palladium review - lockdown laughs and feelgood fun

Veronica Lee

Worth the wait for this Covid-affected tour

Reissue CDs Weekly: Psychedelic Soul - Produced By Norman Whitfield

Kieron Tyler

First-ever overview of the storied producer and songwriter

Gabriela Montero, Kings Place review - improvising to a Chaplin classic is the icing on a zesty cake

David Nice

Grabbing the audience and never letting go at the start of the London Piano Festival

Sarah Hall: Burntcoat review - love after the end of the world

India Lewis

Beautiful lives of loss, in a pandemic close to our own

Bavouzet, Manchester Camerata, Takács-Nagy, Stoller Hall, Manchester review - together again

Robert Beale

A great partnership returns to public Mozart recording project

The Midnight Bell, New Adventures, Sadler's Wells review - dance theatre at its most compelling

Jenny Gilbert

Matthew Bourne hits his stride in an engrossing picture of lovelessness in 1930s London

The Mirror and the Light, Gielgud Theatre review - nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition

Ismene Brown

Third time round, Hilary Mantel self-adapts, and eviscerates, her novel on stage

Metamorphoses, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse review - punchy, cleverly reworked classic

Rachel Halliburton

Any figure in Roman mythology today would be at the pointy end of cancel culture

theartsdesk at the Two Moors Festival - birdsong, gongs and nocturnes in Dartmoor churches

David Nice

In tune with the natural wonders of Devon's high places, musicians excel

Yoko Ono, Mend Piece, Whitechapel Gallery review – funny and sad in equal measure

Sarah Kent

A sign of the times in broken crockery

Wole Soyinka: Chronicles from the Land of the Happiest People on Earth review – sprawling satire of modern-day Nigeria

Daniel Baksi

The Nobel Laureate ends a 48 year wait for his third novel

Hamlet, Young Vic review - Cush Jumbo flares in a low-key production

Heather Neill

Youthful Elsinore reflects life in present-day London

Patti Smith, Royal Albert Hall review - a wild ride from a musical legend

Katie Colombus

A transcendental experience from the poet laureate of punk rock

First Person: director Frederic Wake-Walker on Glyndebourne's new 'Fidelio'

Frederic Wake-Walker

Tracing the problems of staging Beethoven's only opera over five years

Theaster Gates - A Clay Sermon, Whitechapel Gallery review - mud, mud, glorious mud

Sarah Kent

Ceramics as a religion and a way of life

What If If Only, Royal Court review - short if not sweet

Gary Naylor

A beautifully staged reflection on the pain of confronting loss and the need to move on

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latest in today

Macbeth, Almeida Theatre review – vivid, but much too long

Remembering the months of lockdown, I can’t be the only person to thrill to this play’s opening lines, “When shall we three meet again?”, a phrase...

Manic Street Preachers, Brighton Dome review - solid gig occ...

There is a three song segment midway through Manic Street Preachers’ set which suddenly ramps everything up. For this brief while, the performance...

Tamestit, LSO, Ticciati, LSO St Luke's review - viola a...

Returning to LSO St Luke’s, formerly a beacon in the darkness of...

White Noise, Bridge Theatre review - provocative if not alwa...

"I can't sleep": So goes the fateful opening line of White Noise, the Suzan-Lori Parks play disturbing enough to spark many a restless...

Album: Coldplay - Music Of The Spheres

Chris Martin has talked, not for the first time, of this finally being the Coldplay era of “no rules or fear”. Swedish...

Album: Finneas - Optimist

This record is a heck of a metatextual experience to listen to. In releasing his debut album, 24 year old Finneas O’Connell is attempting to step...

Romeo and Juliet, Birmingham Royal Ballet & Royal Ballet...

Two households, both alike in dignity … and both launching their respective seasons with a production of...

Maximo Park, Saint Luke's and the Winged Ox, Glasgow -...

Time waits for no band, as Maximo Park’s lively singer Paul Smith opined early into his band’s set. “I am young and I am lost” he declared during...

Karine Polwart, Birmingham Town Hall Review: Expertly crafte...

With a few extra dates to her rescheduled UK tour, Scottish folk legend Karine Polwart returned to Birmingham Town Hall with some tunes from her...

Mary Wellesley: Hidden Hands review - passion in the parchme...

Outside Wales – even, perhaps, within it – few students will have...