mon 08/08/2022

dance

NDT2, Sadler's Wells review - a diverse triple bill

Katie Colombus

It's not every junior dance company that could sell out a house at Sadler's Wells. But NDT2 – younger sibling of one of Europe’s top contemporary dance ensembles, Nederlands Dans Theater, have grown over the last 35 years into a box office blockbuster in their own right.

Read more...

Saturday Night Fever, Peacock Theatre review - crowd-pleaser stays true to its roots

Gary Naylor

Wind the clock back 45 years and the Big Apple was bankrupt, the lights had gone out and many native New Yorkers were packing their bags. Gangs controlled whole neighbourhoods, drugs were the currency of choice and, for a kid with no college, prospects were strictly limited.

Read more...

Acosta Danza, Sadler's Wells review - here comes the sun

Jenny Gilbert

If Carlos Acosta could have bottled the year-round sunshine of his native Cuba, he would have. Instead he did the next best thing and founded Acosta Danza. Seven years later, years which included a UK tour kiboshed by the first lockdown, when the company only narrowly made it on to the last plane back to Havana, the troupe is sleeker, slightly smaller, but if anything even more ebullient.

Read more...

Kontakthof, Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch review - struggling to make contact

Jenny Gilbert

Twelve years may have passed since her earthly demise, but you still hear people say they saw Pina Bausch the other night. Bausch remains synonymous with the company she founded, Tanztheater Wuppertal, and with a style of dance theatre that launched an entire new category.

Read more...

Raymonda, English National Ballet, Coliseum review - a creaky old standard, lavishly restored to health

Jenny Gilbert

Neglected classics, whether books, plays or ballets, are usually neglected for a reason, and so it is with the three-act ballet Raymonda. A hit in 1898 for the Imperial ballet in St Petersburg but unperformed in this country since the 1960s, its ineffectual heroine, fuzzy sense of geography and offensively silly plot have made it impossible to stage in full – at least in Britain.

Read more...

Best of 2021: Dance

Jenny Gilbert

It was never going to be a bumper year, just a bumpy one. With theatres dark until May or later, the usual 11 or 12 months of potential live-dance going was reduced to four or five. There was one bright shaft of optimism in late spring, and another in the autumn, when the gloom-clouds parted to allow a few weeks of almost-normality. But now we seem to have come full circle.

Read more...

Matthew Bourne's Nutcracker!, Sadler's Wells Theatre review - new candy, but the nuts are off

Ismene Brown

The legendary quip of a sophisticated ballet critic that we are all one Nutcracker nearer death never rang so true as now. One goes to the theatre with one’s heart in one’s mouth, behind the partypooping mask.

Read more...

Starstruck, Scottish Ballet review - smart, sassy and cinematic

Jenny Gilbert

How do you picture Gene Kelly? Most likely in his effervescent screen persona, either as the burly ex-GI of An American in Paris, or as the hoofer without a raincoat in Singin’ in the Rain.

Read more...

Past Present, Linbury Theatre review - historic, but very much alive

Jenny Gilbert

Not so long ago, a few decades at most, anyone with a passing interest in dance knew what “modern” looked like. It was earthbound, usually barefoot, and it focussed on mundane movements such as walking or lying down as often as it looked like dance. It sometimes even turned up its nose at being seen in a theatre. 

Read more...

Ballet Black, Linbury Theatre review - an essential part of the landscape

Jenny Gilbert

The colour of a shoe might seem a trivial thing. But when in 2018 the dancewear manufacturer Freed launched the UK’s first range of pointe shoes to match darker skin tones, true equal opportunity in British ballet came a big step closer.

Read more...

Pages

latest in today

Prom 27, Dinnerstein, National Youth Orchestra, Gourlay revi...

Danny Elfman – the punk rocker-turned-film composer behind Batman, Spider-Man, Edward Scissorhands and The Simpsons...

Burn, Edinburgh International Festival 2022 review - bold, r...

In retrospect, all the clues were there. A star actor embarking on a new performance genre; a fresh reappraisal of one of...

Utopia, Limited, National Gilbert & Sullivan Opera Compa...

Joseph Heller grew tired of being told that he’d never written anything as good as Catch 22. ‘Who has?’, he'd retort. In the same...

Edinburgh Fringe 2022 reviews: Boy / Intruder|Intruz

Boy, Summerhall

Nature or nurture? It...

Album: Boris - Heavy Rocks

Boris are an eclectic Japanese band, with over 20 albums to their name. Following their creative instincts and often recording live with no...

Edinburgh Fringe 2022 reviews: Les Dawson: Flying High / Bor...
 
Les Dawson: Flying High, Assembly George Square ★★★...
Music Reissues Weekly: The Movers - Vol. 1 1970-1976

After a burst of gun-shot drumming, “Hot Coffee” instantly hits its groove. Simple but insistent guitar, a rubbery bass line and electric organ...

Nightclubbing: The Birth of Punk Rock in NYC review - cheap...

Bankruptcy, rubble, rape and murder: Manhattan in the Seventies could be grim, as multiple New York punk memoirs make clear. The trade-off was the...

South Pacific, Sadler's Wells review - strong singing i...

How old is Emile de Becque? Perhaps because my first Emile was the 1958 film version’s Rossano Brazzi, my vision of the lonely French...

Edinburgh Fringe 2022 reviews: Tiff Stevenson / Seann Walsh...
 
Tiff Stevenson, Pleasance Courtyard ★★★★
...